What is speech therapy?

Speech disorders occur when a person has difficulty producing speech sounds correctly or fluently ...or has problems with his or her voice or resonance. Language disorders occur when a person has trouble understanding others (receptive language), or sharing thoughts, ideas, and feelings (expressive language). Language disorders may be spoken or written and may involve the form (phonology, morphology, syntax), content (semantics), and/or use (pragmatics) of language in functional and socially appropriate ways. Social communication disorders occur when a person has trouble with the social use of verbal and nonverbal communication.

- The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2017)

Who is a speech language pathologist (SLP)?

A speech language pathologist (SLP) is a health professional with a Master's degree who is qualified to evaluate and treat children with speech, language, social communication, cognitive-communication, and swallowing disorders.¹ Speech language pathologists must complete an accredited speech language pathology program, supervised clinical practicums, and a national certification examination to qualify for a license to practice. All of our speech therapists at Milestone Pediatric Therapy are licensed in the State of California.

Who is a speech language pathology assistant (SLPA)?

A speech language pathology assistant (SLPA) is a health professional with a bachelor degree who is qualified to provide speech therapy treatment under the supervision of a speech language pathologist. A SLPA has received their education through ASHA-accredited programs and has passed a national-board exam to receive their license to practice. All SLPAs at Milestone Pediatric Therapy are licensed practitioners in the State of California.

What do speech therapists focus on?

Speech interventions may include:

  • Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems
  • Articulation
  • Cognition
  • Expressive and Receptive language
  • Fluency
  • Feeding and Swallowing
  • Form (phonology, morphology, syntax)
  • Hearing
  • Social communication (e.g. greeting, commenting, asking questions)
  • Pragmatics

Who needs speech therapy?

Children experiencing language delays or challenges may qualify for speech therapy. Ask your child's pediatrician if speech therapy could help benefit your child.

Some common diagnoses that speech therapists work with:

  • Apraxia & Oral Motor Deficits
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Auditory Processing & Reading Difficulties
  • Cerebral Palsy (CP)
  • Down Syndrome
  • Feeding/Swallow difficulties
  • Global Developmental Delay
  • Speech Language Delay
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Neurological Conditions
  • Rett Syndrome 
  • Stroke
REFERENCES:
¹ AMERICAN SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOCIATION. (2017) About Speech-Language Pathology. retrieved ON NOVEMBER 20, 2017 FROM https://www.asha.org/Students/Speech-Language-Pathologists